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Tuesday, February 04, 2014

Bagaimana membangun data center ?


Building a data centre is a massive undertaking, but it’s one that many 
companies may have to face in the near future. Cloud computing and the 
increasing reliance on web applications and intranets means that current 
data centres, designed for storage and web hosting, are constantly hitting 
the wall in terms of capacity and more than 40% of IT architects are now 
considering expansion of their current centre, or a total new build.Demand 
for data centres, whether they be rented spaces or proprietary units, is 
set to increase dramatically and data storage has even been labelled as 
“the new oil.” Corporations that simply rent server space are having to up 
their game and consider moving into data centre builds or face being held 
to ransom by the industry.If you’re one of them then it’s important to know 
what you’re letting yourself in for and to plan for the future.Think Small, 
Grow Big                               The data centres currently out there 
have become big and slow and the way we’re going, half the world will be 
covered with huge shipping containers filled with racks of servers. The 
next generation need to be smaller, streamlined, more effective and energy 
efficient. It’s time for a total rethink from the ground-up when it comes 
to what’s required of the modern data centre, so if you’re already 
investing in the planning process, then you have to think about ways to 
reduce the company footprint.Go Modular It’s difficult to expand current 
data centres because technology moves so fast and it’s impossible to marry 
up networks, servers and silos. A modular approach creates unique building 
blocks that can be pulled, replaced and linked to the next in the chain at 
any point.Of course even the definition of modular has changed. In the old 
days it used to be huge metal containers fitted out with racks of servers. 
Now it can mean much smaller, single-rack solutions. The advantage is that 
the blocks can be apportioned where they’re needed most and you don’t need 
to future-proof the system, or provide too much in the way of computing 
resource for individual applications right now by providing too much 
capacity. You can simply beef up each part of the system when it needs it 
most.A single appliance can consolidate the compute and storage tiers with 
a modular system, which reduces the workload on staff and streamlines the 
whole process. Modular systems are also portable, which is one of the 
reasons Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley have adopted this build out 
style.Convergence is CoolThe latest trend in data centres is to have a 
single resource tier that contain the server and storage in one. This 
reduces the need for additional networking equipment and hardware. That is 
good for costs, scalability and future proofingGo Public Cloud, and 
Private...Many companies want to operate a public cloud to allow customers 
to access applications, while keeping sensitive company information and the 
customer’s personal details safely under lock and key. Hybrid cloud 
environments are becoming increasingly popular and even if you don’t need 
it now, you might need to follow the model of Amazon’s Web Services sooner 
than you think. Keep Hardware SimpleMany IT leaders have got caught in the 
trap of upgrading specialised data centre hardware every few years. There’s 
no way to amortise those costs and there’s a distinct lack of flexibility 
in the set-up, as some don’t support new software capabilities that some 
cloud computing solutions demand.If you spend big on hardware that becomes 
redundant within a few years then you may find yourself explaining things 
to the board shortly before collecting a P45. Commodity hardware is cheap 
and that allows the investment in the software that can make the best use 
of modular clusters of hardware. Power low cost hardware with a software 
layer and you won’t need to spend big. So if cost is an issue then invest 
more in the software layer, and less in the actual nuts and bolts.  
Standardise, too, to make sure that the whole operation runs lean. Most 
operations can be served by a few different configurations, so keep the 
whole data centre as close to your ideal set-up as possible.Some IT 
managers don’t have to worry about the costs and can spend freely on the 
latest technology, but they are the lucky ones. However, it’s still worth 
pointing out that it’s necessary to maintain a balance between affordable 
and cheap. You also can’t afford for parts to be falling over very often, 
so do choose quality parts from a reputable supplier, rather than 
rebranded, cheaper hardware.A recent trend is to install flash memory to 
enterprise storage solutions as a quick and easy means of expansion. This 
creates hybrids that run much faster than the original servers and the 
flash memory comes with a number of additional advantages, such as 
reliability. With proprietary hardware it becomes more difficult to absorb 
technological advances and there’s a greater risk of redundancy later 
on.Facebook built its data centres using cheaper hardware. If it’s good 
enough for them, it’s good enough for you.Get Your Budget RightDo not place 
trust exclusively on industry benchmarks, because you could miss out subtle 
expenses like landscaping, permits, power and security. You can help 
minimise the costs by selecting a site that already has the required 
planning permission, and even working within an existing building. Don’t 
underestimate the build costs either, it takes specialist expertise to 
build a data centre with the correct level of safety, protection and future 
proofing.   IBM is investing close to £1 billion in 15 new data centres to 
cope with the expected demand from cloud computing in the coming years. 
Most companies don’t have that kind of money to throw around, but if you’re 
building a data centre now then you should be prepared to squeeze some more 
money out the board to make sure you’re not building another in a few years 
thanks to an exponential hike in data requirements.    Use DCIMDataCentre 
Infrastructure Management (DCIM) software has become an essential part of 
new data centre builds as it helps at every stage, from laying out the 
hardware through to optimising the energy efficiency in an active centre.It 
also helps IT consultants and network designers to work out the complex 
capacity plan, which can affect cooling requirements and the bottom line. 
By switching modules into ‘standby’ mode when the demand is low, DCIM can 
save massive amounts of power and money.With DCIM you can even run the data 
centre remotely and have a so called dark data centre, saving on staffing 
costs. However, security and a good disaster recovery plan will have to be 
implemented if you take this route.Think About the End UserData centres 
used to be a mere storage vessel, but times are changing. Enterprise IT is 
heading towards a consumer model, where employees tap into the system 
through applications and virtual desktop systems that allow the company to 
access applications and desktop information from any device. Employees have 
to share large files like never before, too. This creates a whole different 
set of stresses and strains on the data centre, all of which will need to 
be configured into costs at the planning stage.Consolidation and 
VirtualisationVirtualisation software extends the life of older servers and 
makes sure that new ones are used more efficiently. Virtualisation software 
is also the best way to increase efficiency in terms of the utilisation, 
with some inefficient older servers utilising just 10% of the hardware.By 
increasing the efficiency and using 40% and beyond of the hardware, parts 
of the data centre can be switched to standby while a small part bears the 
load in off-peak times. Inevitably this means cooling equipment can be 
switched off in certain parts of the centre and only a section will need 
monitoring. These are incremental savings, but they all add up.Think About 
an Energy Efficient Data Centre Costs come in all shapes and sizes, and the 
power that feeds your data centre and keeps it cool will be the biggest 
single whole life expense. eBay’s Project Mercury and Project Topaz are the 
poster children for efficiency, thanks to fuel cells from Bloom Energy, 
solar panel set-ups and water recycling for the cooling system.This lowers 
the energy bills by as much as 50% compared to the units eBay leased in the 
past. Significant savings like this help pay for the hardware, so do your 
sums and see how much you can save now and years into the future.  When you 
consider that powering the datacentre will form 20-60% of the overall bill, 
it’s not a cost that can simply be ignored. Add to this the potential 
benefits to the company and its customers when it comes to being a ‘green 
company’ and it’s also very good for business.In the UK natural air cooling 
is now in vogue, thanks to the servers’ ability to run hotter than before. 
Air conditioning isn’t cheap in a house, on this scale it is a huge 
expense. Many data centres in colder countries like the UK, Germany and 
Northern Europe are now built without any form of inbuilt refrigeration, so 
the big players are confident it works. Of course the external air must be 
filtered and kept at the right humidity level, so it isn’t quite 
free.Google has opted for a wind-farm to provide the power for its data 
centre, which just won’t be practical for most companies. Apple, too, has 
an outsize solution with its solar farm idea.Gas turbines offer an 
attractive price point, though, and can be used on a much smaller scale.Low 
power servers, too, can make a huge dent on the energy bill. HP and Dell 
both unveiled low energy alternatives to the x86 servers and blades 
recently and the latest models owe a great deal to the smartphone 
revolution. Smartphones have to balance performance and battery drain and 
so micromanage each stage much more carefully than with the x86. That 
technology, strangely, is filtering up.Of course it’s not just about the 
money. An environmentally-friendly data centre, or as friendly as it can 
be, is an essential step for any socially responsible company.Location, 
Location, LocationGoogle is currently building a data centre on a disused 
barge in the San Francisco Bay area, and you can think outside the box when 
it comes to location, too. An existing building can save big on the initial 
build, but there are radical solutions that may work better, for a variety 
of reasons. Government grants might be available for redeveloping an older 
site and there can be PR advantages to redeveloping a brownfield site in 
your local area. You can even come up with an innovative solution that 
reflects your brand, just like Google.Data centres come in all shapes and 
sizes and serve a variety of businesses and organisations. From the small 
data centre that offers web hosting, VPS and virtualised applications, to 
the huge Amazon-style data centre(s), there’s innumerable options.All of 
this makes a difference to the type of hardware and software used, the 
location, the cabling used and more. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all 
solution, data centres need meticulous planning, perfect design and a 
highly professional outfit to undertake all of the work that’s necessary. 
Of course, it’s likely than you’ll need skills outside of IT to add to the 
build team as well. Whatever the case, it’s no easy undertaking and it’s 
worth making sure that you have the funds and vision to match your 
plans.Thinking about building a data centre? Quadratek has extensive 
experience in all types of network design and installation and has worked 
on government and MOD installations, as well as smaller projects. Get in 
touch to see how we can help you realise your data centre ambition.
Building a data centre is a massive undertaking, but it’s one that many companies may have to face in the near future. Cloud computing and the increasing reliance on web applications and intranets means that current data centres, designed for storage and web hosting, are constantly hitting the wall in terms of capacity and more than 40% of IT architects are now considering expansion of their current centre, or a total new build.
Demand for data centres, whether they be rented spaces or proprietary units, is set to increase dramatically and data storage has even been labelled as “the new oil.” Corporations that simply rent server space are having to up their game and consider moving into data centre builds or face being held to ransom by the industry.
If you’re one of them then it’s important to know what you’re letting yourself in for and to plan for the future.

Think Small, Grow Big                              

The data centres currently out there have become big and slow and the way we’re going, half the world will be covered with huge shipping containers filled with racks of servers. The next generation need to be smaller, streamlined, more effective and energy efficient. It’s time for a total rethink from the ground-up when it comes to what’s required of the modern data centre, so if you’re already investing in the planning process, then you have to think about ways to reduce the company footprint.

Go Modular

It’s difficult to expand current data centres because technology moves so fast and it’s impossible to marry up networks, servers and silos. A modular approach creates unique building blocks that can be pulled, replaced and linked to the next in the chain at any point.
Of course even the definition of modular has changed. In the old days it used to be huge metal containers fitted out with racks of servers. Now it can mean much smaller, single-rack solutions. The advantage is that the blocks can be apportioned where they’re needed most and you don’t need to future-proof the system, or provide too much in the way of computing resource for individual applications right now by providing too much capacity. You can simply beef up each part of the system when it needs it most.
A single appliance can consolidate the compute and storage tiers with a modular system, which reduces the workload on staff and streamlines the whole process. Modular systems are also portable, which is one of the reasons Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley have adopted this build out style.

Convergence is Cool

The latest trend in data centres is to have a single resource tier that contain the server and storage in one. This reduces the need for additional networking equipment and hardware. That is good for costs, scalability and future proofing

Go Public Cloud, and Private...

Many companies want to operate a public cloud to allow customers to access applications, while keeping sensitive company information and the customer’s personal details safely under lock and key. Hybrid cloud environments are becoming increasingly popular and even if you don’t need it now, you might need to follow the model of Amazon’s Web Services sooner than you think.

 Keep Hardware Simple

Many IT leaders have got caught in the trap of upgrading specialised data centre hardware every few years. There’s no way to amortise those costs and there’s a distinct lack of flexibility in the set-up, as some don’t support new software capabilities that some cloud computing solutions demand.
If you spend big on hardware that becomes redundant within a few years then you may find yourself explaining things to the board shortly before collecting a P45. Commodity hardware is cheap and that allows the investment in the software that can make the best use of modular clusters of hardware. Power low cost hardware with a software layer and you won’t need to spend big. So if cost is an issue then invest more in the software layer, and less in the actual nuts and bolts. 
Standardise, too, to make sure that the whole operation runs lean. Most operations can be served by a few different configurations, so keep the whole data centre as close to your ideal set-up as possible.
Some IT managers don’t have to worry about the costs and can spend freely on the latest technology, but they are the lucky ones. However, it’s still worth pointing out that it’s necessary to maintain a balance between affordable and cheap. You also can’t afford for parts to be falling over very often, so do choose quality parts from a reputable supplier, rather than rebranded, cheaper hardware.
A recent trend is to install flash memory to enterprise storage solutions as a quick and easy means of expansion. This creates hybrids that run much faster than the original servers and the flash memory comes with a number of additional advantages, such as reliability. With proprietary hardware it becomes more difficult to absorb technological advances and there’s a greater risk of redundancy later on.
Facebook built its data centres using cheaper hardware. If it’s good enough for them, it’s good enough for you.

Get Your Budget Right

Do not place trust exclusively on industry benchmarks, because you could miss out subtle expenses like landscaping, permits, power and security. You can help minimise the costs by selecting a site that already has the required planning permission, and even working within an existing building. Don’t underestimate the build costs either, it takes specialist expertise to build a data centre with the correct level of safety, protection and future proofing.  
IBM is investing close to £1 billion in 15 new data centres to cope with the expected demand from cloud computing in the coming years. Most companies don’t have that kind of money to throw around, but if you’re building a data centre now then you should be prepared to squeeze some more money out the board to make sure you’re not building another in a few years thanks to an exponential hike in data requirements.   

Use DCIM

DataCentre Infrastructure Management (DCIM) software has become an essential part of new data centre builds as it helps at every stage, from laying out the hardware through to optimising the energy efficiency in an active centre.
It also helps IT consultants and network designers to work out the complex capacity plan, which can affect cooling requirements and the bottom line. By switching modules into ‘standby’ mode when the demand is low, DCIM can save massive amounts of power and money.
With DCIM you can even run the data centre remotely and have a so called dark data centre, saving on staffing costs. However, security and a good disaster recovery plan will have to be implemented if you take this route.

Think About the End User

Data centres used to be a mere storage vessel, but times are changing. Enterprise IT is heading towards a consumer model, where employees tap into the system through applications and virtual desktop systems that allow the company to access applications and desktop information from any device. Employees have to share large files like never before, too. This creates a whole different set of stresses and strains on the data centre, all of which will need to be configured into costs at the planning stage.

Consolidation and Virtualisation

Virtualisation software extends the life of older servers and makes sure that new ones are used more efficiently. Virtualisation software is also the best way to increase efficiency in terms of the utilisation, with some inefficient older servers utilising just 10% of the hardware.
By increasing the efficiency and using 40% and beyond of the hardware, parts of the data centre can be switched to standby while a small part bears the load in off-peak times. Inevitably this means cooling equipment can be switched off in certain parts of the centre and only a section will need monitoring. These are incremental savings, but they all add up.

Think About an Energy Efficient Data Centre

 Costs come in all shapes and sizes, and the power that feeds your data centre and keeps it cool will be the biggest single whole life expense. eBay’s Project Mercury and Project Topaz are the poster children for efficiency, thanks to fuel cells from Bloom Energy, solar panel set-ups and water recycling for the cooling system.
This lowers the energy bills by as much as 50% compared to the units eBay leased in the past. Significant savings like this help pay for the hardware, so do your sums and see how much you can save now and years into the future.  When you consider that powering the datacentre will form 20-60% of the overall bill, it’s not a cost that can simply be ignored. Add to this the potential benefits to the company and its customers when it comes to being a ‘green company’ and it’s also very good for business.
In the UK natural air cooling is now in vogue, thanks to the servers’ ability to run hotter than before. Air conditioning isn’t cheap in a house, on this scale it is a huge expense. Many data centres in colder countries like the UK, Germany and Northern Europe are now built without any form of inbuilt refrigeration, so the big players are confident it works. Of course the external air must be filtered and kept at the right humidity level, so it isn’t quite free.
Google has opted for a wind-farm to provide the power for its data centre, which just won’t be practical for most companies. Apple, too, has an outsize solution with its solar farm idea.
Gas turbines offer an attractive price point, though, and can be used on a much smaller scale.
Low power servers, too, can make a huge dent on the energy bill. HP and Dell both unveiled low energy alternatives to the x86 servers and blades recently and the latest models owe a great deal to the smartphone revolution. Smartphones have to balance performance and battery drain and so micromanage each stage much more carefully than with the x86. That technology, strangely, is filtering up.
Of course it’s not just about the money. An environmentally-friendly data centre, or as friendly as it can be, is an essential step for any socially responsible company.

Location, Location, Location

Google is currently building a data centre on a disused barge in the San Francisco Bay area, and you can think outside the box when it comes to location, too. An existing building can save big on the initial build, but there are radical solutions that may work better, for a variety of reasons. Government grants might be available for redeveloping an older site and there can be PR advantages to redeveloping a brownfield site in your local area. You can even come up with an innovative solution that reflects your brand, just like Google.
Data centres come in all shapes and sizes and serve a variety of businesses and organisations. From the small data centre that offers web hosting, VPS and virtualised applications, to the huge Amazon-style data centre(s), there’s innumerable options.
All of this makes a difference to the type of hardware and software used, the location, the cabling used and more. There isn’t a one-size-fits-all solution, data centres need meticulous planning, perfect design and a highly professional outfit to undertake all of the work that’s necessary. Of course, it’s likely than you’ll need skills outside of IT to add to the build team as well. Whatever the case, it’s no easy undertaking and it’s worth making sure that you have the funds and vision to match your plans.

Dibalik Server Density, ada Fusioncharts.


Behind the scenes of Server Density’s dashboard design: In conversation with David Mytton

Behind the scenes of dashboard design is a series of interviews with Product Managers, Developers and Designers of software products with kick-ass information dashboards to help you get an insider’s view into their making. This is the third part of the series.
Imagine a typical day in a system admin’s life. He has to keep a continuous check on the server load so that the site remains functional at its optimum speed. Now what if you have multiple websites or you are hosted on multiple cloud servers? What does he do when he faces some performance issue on any of his websites or servers? Frantically click one cloud status page after another to check where exactly the issue lies.
Well, Server Density tries to simplify his life a bit. By syncing with major cloud providers, it provides the user a single console to monitor his websites and servers. It monitors websites from locations across the world and combines it with internal server metrics so that the user knows when his site is down and have the metrics to figure out why. It also helps to identify those trends which may become a problem in future.
Server Density DashboardsI recently caught up with David Mytton, Founder & CEO of Server Density, to discuss what went into building their dashboard, their technical considerations and the future of the data visualization industry. Here are the excerpts from the interview:

David Mytton, Founder & CEO of Server Density

What is Server Density and how does it solve user problems?

Server Density is a SaaS tool which helps you run your infrastructure. It syncs with the major cloud providers and allows you to monitor your websites and servers from a single console, an API and mobile app so you can diagnose problems, maintain uptime and maximize performance.

What were the primary reasons behind incorporating a dashboard in your product?

The core functionality of Server Density has always been (and will continue to be) monitoring. We have fantastic historical graphing to explore any problem areas, but the basis for using our software in the past has been in the instance that something just went wrong (i.e. you got an alert)―this use case is very reactive. Our dashboard represents a greater shift towards visibility across the whole infrastructure. It helps to identify negative trends before they become a problem. Server Density is becoming a management solution for your entire infrastructure, and expanding our use case away from simple reactive monitoring.

Who is your primary target user and how does the dashboard help him perform his job better?

Traditionally our customer is a system admin, now the game is changing with the shift towards Development Ops teams who we target as well. Our target user is anyone who has a website (and a server) and who’s passionate about keeping it ‘online’.
Our dashboards allow our users to identify trends and provide a snapshot from a single moment in time across any number of metrics that our user configures. They aim to provide users with a platform for problem solving. They offer insight at the highest level, and present a starting point when you simply don’t know what part of the pipeline is causing trouble.

The Ops dashboard is a recent addition to your product. Tell us something about its added functionality.

Server Density has always had a full featured dashboard but the new release broadens the functionality to pull in relevant data from 3rd parties. If you’re using different vendors and hosting services then it’s important to understand their status alongside your internal metrics and alerting. It helps answer questions like are all my alerts being caused by AWS US-East, again?
Devops Dashboard

How did you go about building the dashboard? What were the technical decisions you had to make?

We use CoffeeScript and Backbone across the whole app UI, mostly because they make development faster and easier. A lot of the dashboard was completely customized to our users’ needs, but the customizable grid layout for positioning was done usingGridster, a jQuery plugin that allows building intuitive draggable layouts from elements spanning multiple columns. After that the individual widgets were styled according to the rest of our app UI.
We had initially anticipated needing a couple of external libraries to do what we wanted with the dashboards, but it turned out that Gridster, combined with our existing CoffeeScript/Backbone setup, did everything.

What were your design considerations for the dashboard?

As with any feature, our primary concern when designing the dashboard was to create a solid foundation that affords us the flexibility to develop a wide range of functionality further down the line. Users of Server Density know their systems well and often have particular ways they like to view their infrastructure. For this reason, we realized there would be a few things the dashboardabsolutely needed to support from the get-go:
  • Multiple, named dashboards
  • User-specific dashboards
  • Customizable layout

Any specific business benefit (in terms of growth) you observed by adding a dashboard?

It’d be hard to attribute our growth down to one feature like our dashboards because we’ve been able to ship so many so quickly over the last 6 months. It would be fair to say though that everything that is on our roadmap is because our customers are asking for ‘it’―we’ve seen a very positive increase in paid conversions since we introduced our dashboards back in November.
Dashboard in office

Do you think information dashboards are important in software products?

Absolutely! Businesses are looking to maintain and improve uptime, and dashboards are a very powerful way for an organization to passively see trends and issues in real time. A dashboard available in an office will allow multiple team members to pick up on issues, rather than relying on one or two people having the right thing open at just the right time.

Where do you see the data visualization industry in 2014?

With the constant growth of technology, we’ve seen an explosion in so-called “big data”. Everything around us is constantly producing data, and we need a way to make sense and relate the numbers to the real world. Data visualization is going to be the key to this, helping us make sense of an increasingly connected world.
If you liked reading this, you may also want to check out the behind the scene dashboard story ofRescueTime and FacileThings.
Have someone you’d like to see featured in this series? Add them in the comment section below.

Fitur baru PRTG : Ticket System


Another new feature for PRTG Network Monitor has arrived! Monitoring your IT infrastructure and taking care of potential issues is even more comprehensible now: The new ticket system lets you and your colleagues from the administration team keep track of all network related issues which PRTG detects. You can use it to document related resolution steps and important system information.

Basically, the ticket system as implemented in PRTG manages and maintains lists of current issues regarding a defined application scenario. One element in this system is a ticket which reports about a particular problem, the status of it, information about the steps which were conducted to resolve it, and the involved person(s) who took care of the issue. You might be familiar with such systems from working with them in your support center or utilizing them as a bug tracking system. Such a ticket system perfectly suits network monitoring: You can use it in PRTG to work on network issues, to gather PRTG system information, and to distribute information and tasks to your colleagues.

Tickets in PRTG can contain information about recent events in your PRTG installation which need a closer look by the administrator or another responsible person. They can be created either by the PRTG system or by PRTG users. If you use PRTG with a team of administrators, you can now assign a monitoring related task together with your comments to a particular user directly in PRTG-quickly and easily with two clicks via the context menus of affected monitoring objects in your device tree. With notification triggers, you can set up PRTG to open tickets (and automatically close them) for any of your sensor alarms.

Notifications as Tickets

With the ticket system, we added a new option to PRTG's notification system as well: When you choose the option "Assign Ticket" within a notification, PRTG will create a ticket automatically and assign it to you (or another PRTG user defined) when there is an outage or a limit triggers the notification. As soon as a notification ticket has been opened, the responsible person receives an email that informs about the new ticket and can take care of the issue immediately. As long as the ticket remains open, you know that the problem persists. If the ticket is assigned to a whole user group (for example, the PRTG System Administrators group), all members of this group receive an email and the first person reacting to it can indicate that the issue is taken care of: "Hey, the disks on our ESX server are running out of space. Since I can take care of the issue, I'll assign this notification ticket to myself!"

A Ticket's Lifecycle: Open—Assign—Edit—Resolve—Close

You can consider each monitoring related task to have a lifecycle in the ticket system:
    1. The task becomes alive when a ticket is created. Either a user or the PRTG system has opened it. For example, a notification was triggered by low disk space. The system creates a notification ticket and assigns it to the admin group.
    2. Then, members of this group take appropriate actions. One member of the group knows who is responsible and assigns this ticket to this person together with a comment describing the problem.
    3. This PRTG user increases the disk space; the alert condition clears and the corresponding sensor turns up again.
    4. Now the user resolves the ticket which goes back to the PRTG admin group.
    5. Another member of this group proofs the solution ("Sensor is indeed green!") and closes the ticket. The lifecycle of the task ends.

      Oh, and by the way, to keep it simpler for you, PRTG can close notification tickets automatically as soon as an alert condition disappears. This comes in handy when an outage appears during night, for example, due to a faulty internet line:
      • PRTG detects the outage, opens a new ticket, and assigns it to a specific user (group) as defined.
      • Your provider restores the internet line and the issue is resolved by the next morning.
      • Because of this, there is no need for an issue tracking for you anymore.
      • PRTG can automatically close the ticket which it originally created when it detected the outage.
      It does this automatically so you don't waste your time by looking into an issue which has already been resolved!

      Three Types of Tickets: User, ToDo, Notification

      In conclusion, we have three types of tickets: user tickets which are created by a user in PRTG; ToDo tickets which are created by PRTG and show important system information and in case of specific system events; and notification tickets which are create in case of monitoring alerts. Tickets are neatly arranged in a list which you can call via PRTG's main menu bar. You can filter the list by ticket status, type, responsible person, related object, and date of last change to find desired information quickly. Keep everything in your network under control—we are sure that tickets will help you to comprehend what is actually going on in your network.

      Tickets Assimilate ToDos

      Until now, PRTG has used ToDos in order to provide you with items regarding important system information or action for you to take as the administrator. For example, new ToDos were created after applying auto-discovery, after connections of new remote probes, for finished reports, or when a new software version was available, as well as for some other system related issues. However, you were only able to view information and to acknowledge it. The introduced ticket system supersedes ToDos, you will be able to view and accomplish system related tasks in a more comprehensible way and relate and work on the issues with your colleagues. PRTG documents each resolution step so you will never miss important information.

      You can also maintain your tickets in PRTG for Android—we plan to include the ticket system into our iOS app in one of the upcoming versions as well!
      If you aren't a PRTG user yet but want to manage network monitoring more comprehensibly with the help of tickets, then try out PRTG's free trial now!

      Automation, yang akan dicari IT sektor Publik



      Most IT pros face a number of challenges managing and modernizing their IT infrastructures – budgets, bandwidth, and bosses often hinder progress – and IT pros in government often face these challenges at an even more exaggerated level. However, SolarWinds has noticed that many public sector IT pros are addressing these challenges by automating technologies in their IT infrastructure. We set out to learn how the automation is going so far. In our recent survey of 162 IT pros from federal and state/local government, we learned the importance of automating technology and the restrictions and red tape that often get in the way of that progress.

      KEY FINDINGS:


      Where are federal IT pros in the automation process? Some have yet to automate anything, but most are somewhere in the process of evaluating technologies, implementing them, or have already completed implementation. In fact, more than two-thirds of survey respondents said they are already in the process of implementing a variety of technologies and 63 percent of respondents are planning an automation project during 2014.

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      Federal IT pros who have automated some or all of their information technologies have already begun to realize real ROI from their automated IT deployments. More than 84 percent of survey respondents said the automation of information technologies in their IT infrastructures was a time- and money-saving investment for their teams, and 67 percent of respondents have seen increases in their teams’ productivity as a result of investments in automation.

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      The automation tools that provide the most overall benefit in terms of time/money saved are:
      • 58.3% Network Configuration Management
      • 41.7% Help Desk
      • 38.8% IP Address Management (including IPv6)
      • 36.6% App/Server Provisioning/Config Management
      • 23.7% Storage Management
      • 22.3% Virtualization Management
      • 20.1% Patch Management and Compliance Reporting
      • 18.0% Business Process/Work Automation
      • 9.4% Log Management
      • 7.9% Mobile Device Management

      So what’s the holdup for the others? And why aren’t IT shops automating everything? As always, lack of budget and lack of training play a part.

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      Even with these roadblocks, though, IT pros in the public sector continue to recognize the importance of streamlining IT. With the breadth of IT management software vendors available, it’s now up to Federal IT pros to identify the most pressing challenges in their IT infrastructures and to find the right automated technologies to simplify those challenges. Luckily, with such strong evidence that automation saves time and money and increases productivity for government organizations, the case to automate is pretty clear.

      FULL SURVEY